Hebrew coin dating

15-May-2020 05:33 by 2 Comments

Hebrew coin dating

Instead, these strange copies were considered to be quaint tokens of an 19th century religious revival and a renewed interest in the Bible among Christians.

But the line between these two events and dates is a intricate path through the history of the Jews in Europe. Some of these imitations of the shekel were given the label, 'censer pieces', because of a misinterpretation of a part of the design on the authentic coins.An industrial area that includes an olive press and storehouses where the olive oil was kept is currently being uncovered next to the estate." The diggers also found no less than dozens of rock-hewn winepresses by the estate house, which had massive walls to discourage marauders, Tendler says.Aside from the wall-ensconced cache, the archaeologist found numerous bronze coins minted by the Hasmonean kings at the site, bearing the names of the kings such as Yehohanan, Judah, Jonathan – and Mattathias, the High Priest and Head of the Council of the Jews. They had been minted farther north, in the city of Tyre, and bear the images of the king, Antiochus VII and his brother Demetrius Israeli, stated Avraham Tendler, director of the excavation on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority.The small hoard was found hidden in a rock crevice by a wall of an impressive agricultural estate, the Israel Antiquities Authority stated.The genuine, ancient shekel, struck during the First War of the Jews against the Romans in A. 66- 70, was a historically important coin, often revered as a relic of the Bible, and it was imitated and reproduced for centuries afterwards.

One large group of these shekel copies, sometimes called 'false shekels' or 'censer pieces', played an indirect part in the creation of the modem State of Israel but they have never been given the recognition or credit they deserve.Or maybe: "The cache that we found is compelling evidence that one of the members of the estate who had saved his income for months needed to leave the house for some unknown reason," Tendler speculated."He buried his money in the hope of coming back and collecting it, but was apparently unfortunate and never returned.The archaeologists also found caves hewn into the bedrock underneath the floors of the estate house."These refuge complexes were connected by means of tunnels between water cisterns, storage pits and hidden rooms," Tendler says.A genuine shekel of the second year of the First War of the Jews against the Romans (AD 67). The ancient Hebrew letters, S B (Shin Bet), representing the date of year two, located above the chalice on the obverse of the most commonly found genuine shekel, was considered by the copiers to be smoke rising from the vessel.